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New Insolvency Office Holders forum launched

During INSOL Europe’s AGM at the Annual Congress in Istanbul (October 2014), Catherine Ottaway (INSOL Europe’s President at the time) announced the decision to create a new forum focused on insolvency…

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INSOL International Reports

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Richard Turton Award 2014

We are delighted to announce that the winner of this year’s award is Anant Khandelwal from India.   Anant works for SBI Capital Markets Limited and is part of the debt restructuring and advisory team…

News
ATHENS, March 2 (Reuters) - Greece's government sought to assure its creditors and investors on Monday that it can cover its funding needs this month, including repaying a 1.5 billion euro loan to the International Monetary Fund. Greece's finance minister has said in a newspaper interview that even though Greece will need a "new arrangement" on its debt in the summer, he understood that international creditors would not entertain a debt haircut. The Greek prime minister has told his party he won't back down in his "battle" with the country's creditors. Greece is focusing on its next move after eurozone members approved a four month extension to its bailout. Greece is running out of options to fund itself despite a four-month bailout extension, raising pressure on Athens to quickly implement reforms it has vocally opposed or default on debt repayments in a matter of weeks. Athens suggested in the past week it might default on some IMF debt it owes in March, which would make it the first advanced economy in the institution’s seven-decade history to fall into protracted arrears with the fund. Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras, facing vocal dissent inside his party over the country’s interim loan deal, on Friday announced a series of populist moves that make good on campaign promises but may face resistance from European creditors. Last week, after much drama, the new Greek government reached a deal with its creditors. Earlier this week, the Greeks filled in some details on how they intend to meet the terms. So how did it go? Brussels Beat: The next hurdle for Greece is to find economic policies that will appease the country’s people as well as its international creditors, says Marcus Walker. BERLIN (AP) — Germany's Parliament overwhelmingly approved the four-month extension of Greece's financial bailout on Friday, despite unease over the new government in Athens. Lawmakers voted 542-32 to back the bailout extension. There were 13 abstentions. Greece was granted the extension by its European creditors, ensuring it remains solvent and does not run the risk of falling out of the euro, but only in exchange for a commitment to budget reforms. Germany is among the countries that needed to approve... Brussels Beat: The next hurdle for Greece is to find economic policies that will appease the country’s people as well as its international creditors, says Marcus Walker.
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